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Spacecraft Design Archive

DESIGN ARCHIVE INDEX

GENERAL ARCHIVE

MISSION CHARACTERIZATIONS

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Mission Characterization Archive

Interplanetary Missions

Clementine/DSPSE Spacecraft
Mark T. Soyka

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ASE 387P - Mission Analysis and Design
The University of Texas at Austin
February 17, 1993


Mission Name: Deep Space Program Science Experiment (DSPSE)/Clementine
Projected Launch Date: January 26, 1994

Mission Description/Objectives:
The DSPSE mission's primary objective is to test the capability and radiation hardness of a suite of Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) sensors, exercise a series of intercept algorithms, and test autonomous estimation/navigation algorithms. The goal is to produce a lightweight spacecraft (s/c) in less than two years from initial concept to launch for less than 70 million dollars. The spacecraft will be sent to the Moon where it will be placed in a polar orbit for two months to map for minerals. Then the spacecraft will flyby the asteroid 1620 Geographos at a miss distance of 100 km in order to test the sensors and determine interesting facts about the asteroid. (See Figure 1 for a diagram of the spacecraft.)

The objectives will be reached in the following way: the radiation hardness will be characterized by multiple passes through the Van Allen Radiation Belts and the sensor response will be measured throughout; the intercept algorithms will be exercised during the asteroid flyby; and the autonomous algorithms will be used to estimate the position of the spacecraft in all phases of the mission.

According to Lt. Col. Pedro Rustan of SDIO, this mission will speed up technology transfer to civil users and it will provide realistic radiation levels, speeds, and navigation that SDIO needs for its military missions while utilizing 1990's technology.[1]