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VOYAGE to Spread Space Excitement Educator Newsletter

Volume VIII, Issue 2
Editor Talia Jurgens
February 20, 2008

Thacher Scholars Award
http://www.strategies.org/ThacherScholars

IGES Announces 2008 Thacher Scholars Award
$3,500 in Prizes Available; Entries Must Be Received by April 4, 2008

Arlington, Va.‹In an effort to engage the next generation of Earth scientists, the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) is now accepting entries for the 2008 Thacher Scholars Award, to be given to secondary school students demonstrating the best use of geospatial tools or data to study our home planet.

Eligible tools and data include satellite remote sensing, aerial photography, geographic information systems (GIS), and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Entries can be submitted by individuals or teams, either by hard copy or by emailed PDF.

U.S. students in grades 9-12, including U.S. citizens attending schools in foreign countries, are eligible to receive cash awards in the amount of $2,000 for first place, $1,000 for second place and $500 for third place. For each winning student or team, a teacher or designated adult 3coach2 will receive a $200 gift card to Amazon.com.

Entries must not exceed 20 pages, and will be judged by IGES staff based on their scientific and technical accuracy; creativity and originality; quality of presentation; thoroughness of research, methods and procedures; and demonstration of knowledge gained.

Winners will be announced by May 9, 2008.

The Thacher Scholars Award was founded in honor of former IGES board member Peter S. Thacher, an internationally recognized leader in promoting the use of satellite remote sensing. During a distinguished career, he served as deputy director of the United Nations Environment Program, as an advisor to NASA and, at the time of his death in 1999, as president of the Earth Council Foundation-U.S.

Geospatial technologies have numerous uses in science research, ranging from climate prediction to archaeology. They can improve human understanding of the Earth system, including interactions among the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere and hydrosphere. And they can improve quality of life by supporting weather prediction, natural hazards monitoring, transportation, land-use planning, agriculture, coastal management, public health and emergency response.

For more information on the Thacher Scholars Award, including contest rules, judging rubrics, questions to help guide student projects, and a list of related resources, please visit above website.


The 2008 Meeting of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
St. Louis, MO: May 31 - June 4, 2008
http://www.astrosociety.org/2008meeting

Held in conjunction with the summer meeting of the American Astronomical Society, this exciting meeting will consist of hands-on workshops (over the weekend) and then a three-day symposium to help educators, scientists, public information professionals, and everyone working in astronomy and space-science outreach to prepare for the year-long celebration of 400 years of astronomy (since Galileo first turned his telescope to the skies).

Endorsed by the United Nations, UNESCO and the International Astronomical Union, the 2009 International Year of Astronomy (IYA) aims to stimulate worldwide interest in science through engagement in astronomy activities -- with the central theme of The Universe: Yours to Discover. More than 100 countries are organizing events. The U.S. effort has the aim to provide an engaging astronomy experience to every person in the country, to nurture existing partnerships, and to build new connections to sustain public interest in astronomy. Visit above Website.


EngineerGirl Essay Contest
http://www.engineergirl.org

We use energy in almost everything we do, but if we aren't careful there won't be enough. The future of energy is the topic of the 2008 EngineerGirl! essay contest.

Both girls and boys may compete. To enter, individual students write an essay of no more than 750 words describing how they believe engineers will provide energy for the future. The entry deadline is March 1. First-place winners will receive a check for $500. Second-place entries will be awarded $250: third-place, $100.

For complete contest details, go to above website.


The Women in Engineering Program
http://www.engr.utexas.edu/wep/precollege/girlday.cfm

Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day Saturday, February 23, 2008, 2 - 5 p.m.
Cockrell School of Engineering Complex

GIRL DAY PROGRAM:
The Women in Engineering Program (WEP) at The University of Texas at Austin is gearing up for Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day (Girl Day) on Saturday, February 23, 2008 from 2 - 5 pm. We are expecting at least the number of participants we had last year (797 last year; 910 already signed up for this year) and need your help to make the day great! In addition to over 1,000 1st - 8th grade girls expected to participate, over 300 engineering student, alumni, faculty and staff volunteers, along with practicing engineers from industry, will ensure a fun and exciting engineering learning experience.

At Girl Day, participants learn problem-solving methods, complete several engineering design challenges, learn about a variety of engineering careers, and meet outstanding role models from both industry and the university. WEP invites you join in the fun by registering to volunteer before, during, or after the event. OR, if you have a 1st through 8th grader, bring her/him out for the afternoon of fun.

WEP and the Girl Day participants and volunteers greatly value your generosity and community support in our efforts to recruit more women into the engineering field and to excite pre-college students about engineering opportunities.


Cratering the Moon Challenge From NASA Quest
Nasa Sponsored Workshop July 13-19, 2008
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/fieldtrips/2008/

Spend the week with planetary scientists visiting the site of Ancient Glacial Lake Missoula and tracing its flood waters through Montana, Idaho, and into Washington. Examine the geologic evidence for catastrophic flooding, as well as for past volcanism in this region. From these field experiences and accompanying classroom activities, participants will build an understanding of surface processes on Earth, including water flow, volcanism, glaciation, and sedimentation. Attendees will extend their understanding to interpret what the features on the surface of Mars suggest about the past environments and history of the red planet.

The experience will be divided between the field and lab, where participants work with classroom-tested, hands-on inquiry based activities and resources that can be used to enhance Earth and space science teaching in the classroom. Participants receive lesson plans, supporting resources, and presentations. A limited number of grants are available to cover registration.

Join us for hands-on, real-world experience to enhance your teaching about Earth and space science — and the connections between these exciting fields of research! For more information about costs and logistics, and to apply for the experience, please visit above website.


Moon Math! -- The Newest Addition to NASA Quest
http://quest.nasa.gov/vft/#moon_math.

Moon Math! is a set of two mathematics units designed for students in grades 6-9. The units are centered on the theme of lunar habitat design. Each unit is supported by paper-and-pencil activities, as well as an interactive software application.

All lesson plans and software applications for these units are free.


Floods and Flows: Exploring Mars Geology on Earth
NASA Field Based Workshop
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/fieldtrips/2008/

Spend the week with planetary scientists visiting the site of Ancient Glacial Lake Missoula and tracing its flood waters through Montana, Idaho, and into Washington. Examine the geologic evidence for catastrophic flooding, as well as for past volcanism in this region. >From these field experiences and accompanying classroom activities, participants will build an understanding of surface processes on Earth, including water flow, volcanism, glaciation, and sedimentation. Attendees will extend their understanding to interpret what the features on the surface of Mars suggest about the past environments and history of the red planet.

The experience will be divided between the field and lab, where participants work with classroom-tested, hands-on inquiry based activities and resources that can be used to enhance Earth and space science teaching in the classroom. Participants receive lesson plans, supporting resources, and presentations. A limited number of grants are available to cover registration.

Join us for hands-on, real-world experience to enhance your teaching about Earth and space science — and the connections between these exciting fields of research!

For more information about costs and logistics, and to apply for the experience, please visit above website.


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