TEXAS SPACE GRANT CONSORTIUM
ABOUT TSGCHIGHER EDUCATION FACULTYHIGHER EDUCATION STUDENTSK-12 EDUCATION
STANDARD TEXT ENLARGE TEXT ABOUT TEXT SETTINGS
NASA Means Business

ABOUT NASA MEANS BUSINESS

What It Is

Why Your Knowledge Is Needed

Who May Participate

How to Participate

When and Where the Program Will Take Place

Program Amendments

NMB TEAMS

Finalist Teams for 2005

Past Teams & Their Work

 

 

 

PROGRAM CONTACTS

Burke O. Fort
fort@mail.utexas.edu

voice: 512-471-7225
fax: 512-471-3585

3925 West Braker Lane, Suite 200
Austin, Texas 78759

toll-free switchboard:
1-800-248-8752

 

 


I hear and I forget.

President G W BushOn January 14, 2004, President George W. Bush announced the Nation's new vision for space exploration. It is arguable that few of the many who heard him that day can remember the precise words he said. Some might be able to quote verbatim a pivotal phrase; but for most, direct memory of the words themselves has been lost.

Many got the gist of the message, although several not particularly accurately, such as those who thought the President cancelled the International Space Station program. Verbal communication is particularly subject to "noise in the signal."

President J F KennedyBut many do remember the tone of his voice, which conveyed a great deal of information, too, much like that of President Kennedy's voice announcing our Nation's first space exploration campaign. But, unless President Bush's speech is repeated and repeated, as President Kennedy's has been, the words will likely fade into one's cognitive oblivion, absent a periodic trip back to the speech transcript.

By themselves, words in speeches like President Bush's seldom form meaningful messages without a thorough rereading. Without images and inflections, they are like a downpour that runs off with little soaking in.