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Stem Enhancement in Earth Science (SEES) High School Summer Intern Program

ABOUT SEES

HOW TO APPLY

ELIGIBILITY

PROJECT CHOICES

FAQ

PAST PRESENTATIONS

 

 

 

PROGRAM CONTACTS

Margaret Baguio
Senior Education and Outreach Coordinator
baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu

voice: 512-471-6922
fax: 512-471-3585

3925 West Braker Lane, Suite 200
Austin, Texas 78759

toll-free switchboard:
1-800-248-8742


The SEES High School Summer Intern Program is in partnership with NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice NNH15ZDA004C Award NNX16AB89A.

 

SEES PROJECT CHOICES

SPACE RESEARCH

SCIENCE ON THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION
The International Space Station is a unique place – a convergence of science, technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and makes research breakthroughs not possible on Earth. It is a microgravity laboratory in which an international crew of six people live and work while traveling at a speed of five miles per second, orbiting Earth every 90 minutes. Interns will explore experiments being conducted aboard the ISS.

IDENTIFYING NEAR EARTH ASTEROID HAZARDS
In addition to learning about the tools astronomers use, interns will learn about the Solar System, its small bodies, and the hazards these bodies could pose to Earth. They will search for unmeasured asteroids on archive images taken at McDonald Observatory, determine and report their positions. Interns will measure brightness variation for some of these bodies to find the rotation period and make conclusions about their shape. In the process they will be introduced to the digital image toolkit of astronomers.

DISASTER RESEARCH WITH MAGIC (MID-AMERICAN GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION CENTER)

DISASTER MAP: USING SATELLITES FOR EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
Interns will focus on a recent flood, wildfire, or tropical storm event, review satellite image datasets from NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the US Geological Survey (USGS) collected before, during and after the event, and test best practices for rapid information extraction from these data. We will use image analysis and investigate related geospatial information resources with the goal of creating and distributing products for emergency response applications and societal benefit.

FLOOD RESPONSE
Interns will compare National Weather Service Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) products derived from Radar with rainfall gauge values collected in the same time and space. This will provide ground truth evidence of estimations compared to captured rain totals. Interns will also develop Python scripts to automate the transformation of QPE point data into an interpolated gridded surface that can be tiled for rapid consumption by web-based mapping applications via rest endpoints. Activities will simulate recent flood events with the goal of improving future flood response scenarios.

CLIMATE RESEARCH WITH CSR (CENTER FOR SPACE RESEARCH)

WEIGHING WHERE THE WATER GOES
Interns will analyze data from GRACE (Gravity Recover and Climate Experiment), twin satellites launched in March 2002, that are making detailed measurements of Earth's gravity field changes and revolutionizing investigations about Earth’s water resources over land, ice, and oceans, as well as earthquakes and crustal deformations. These discoveries are having far-reaching benefits to society and the world's population.

MEASURING ICE SHEET CHANGES
Interns will examine climate data over Greenland and Antarctica from ICESat (2003-2009), ICESat-2 (2018-) and other satellites. Analyses will include data visualization, satellite calibration, and comparisons with other measurements globally over ice sheets, sea ice, land, vegetation, and ocean/water surfaces. Investigations of some primary questions surrounding the missions include how to link the data from the two missions and how to optimally compute changes of the Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets.

MISSION DESIGN

OBSERVING EARTH FROM SPACE
This engineering project will immerse interns in NASA content and activities while learning about rockets, spacecraft trajectories, and observing the Earth from space. While tackling this engineering project, interns will learn about the Sun-Earth-Moon system dynamics, power systems, and communication while designing the mission. Students will design student payloads for the CANDEL satellite system. The students will also have the opportunity to suggest improvements to the CANDEL system itself. Each participating student will, as part of their work, will design an experiment for the CANDEL system.

EXPLORE THE MOON
Interns will study the spectral effects of space weathering and impact gardening on the evolution of the lunar soil using remote sensing data. Understanding the effects from these processes improves the ability to map the true composition of planetary crusts.

MARS EXPLORATION
NASA is committed to the human exploration of Mars. Many of the technologies are already in place, and the rocket boosters and some of the spacecraft required are currently being built. The small nuclear reactors required to provide the necessary power have already been designed and tested by the Department of Energy. But prior to sending humans to Mars, there needs to be the infrastructure on the planet surface that is necessary to sustain the first crews to visit. This includes power, habitation, water, food, health maintenance, mobility (space suits and rovers), emergency care, and scientific support functions. Using basic engineering design principles, interns will design a Mars village that will allow people to live and work productively and safely for up to 1000 days on the Mars surface. Small scale prototypes will be built by 3D printing.